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Way Forward in Promoting Adoption and Investment in Green Energy

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By Hon. Dr. Kariuki Muigua, OGW, PhD, C.Arb, FCIArb (Leading Environmental Law Scholar, Sustainable Development Policy Advisor, Natural Resources Lawyer and Dispute Resolution Expert from Kenya), The African Arbitrator of the Year 2022, Kenya’s ADR Practitioner of the Year 2021, CIArb (Kenya) Lifetime Achievement Award 2021 and ADR Publisher of the Year 2021 and Author of the Kenya’s First ESG Book: Embracing Environmental Social and Governance (ESG) tenets for Sustainable Development” (Glenwood, Nairobi, July 2023) and and Kenya’s First Two Climate Change Law Book: Combating Climate Change for Sustainability (Glenwood, Nairobi, October 2023) and Achieving Climate Justice for Development (Glenwood, Nairobi, October 2023)*

The economic, societal and environmental benefits of green energy sources such as renewable energy are numerous. It is available in abundance, cheaper and a healthier option for people and the planet. There is thus need to promote sustainability in the energy sector through the adoption and investing in the abundant renewable energy available all over the planet. This will be essential in enhancing access to clean and affordable energy which is a fundamental human right and a critical component of the Sustainable Development agenda.

It has been pointed that in Kenya while notable progress has been made towards enhancing access to electricity through measures such as the rural electrification program, progress remains slow in promoting clean cooking facilities with bio-energy sources such as charcoal and wood fuel still being the most common source of energy in Kenya especially among the rural population. However, the environmental concerns raised by these sources of energy such as climate change calls for the adoption of green sources of energy.

Measures can be put in place to enhance access to clean energy sources for purposes of cooking such as reducing the cost of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) to promote its affordability. Further, costs related to electricity such as connection charges and billing costs should be made affordable for the benefit of all Kenyans especially those in rural areas. This will ensure adoption of green energy while also fostering the right of access to clean and affordable energy. In addition, there is need for government support through funding and putting in place relevant programs and policy measures in order to ensure adequate investment and adoption of green energy.

In Kenya, there is need to realize the vision of the Energy Act in order to adopt green energy sources such as renewable energy. Further, the Rural Electrification and Renewable Energy Corporation needs to effectively discharge its mandate in order to promote the adoption of green energy sources in Kenya. There is also need for governments to put in place appropriate measures such as tax incentives and appropriate laws and policies in order to encourage investments in green energy sources by entities such as multinational corporations. This will ensure green financing and investment in renewable energy projects and provide practical solutions for filling the green financing gap which is a key concern in adopting green energy especially in developing countries. It is also necessary promote public participation in the journey towards adopting green energy in order to guarantee energy justice.

Sustainability in the energy sector also calls for the identification of the energy needs of consumers in a country and ensuring that the needs are met in a manner that is efficient. Thus, in fostering investments in the energy sector, players such as the government and the private sector are required to ensure that they adopt measures towards promoting acceptability of green energy projects to local communities and that further, such projects are socially sustainable. Community consultation through meaningful public participation is important to ensure that there is public acceptance and cooperation in green energy projects. Public participation is an essential component of environmental governance including investments in green energy as envisaged under the Rio Declaration which acknowledges that environmental issues are best handled with the participation of all concerned citizens, at the relevant level. Public participation has also been enshrined as one of the national values and principles under the Constitution of Kenya. Public participation can thus promote energy justice in the quest towards adopting green energy.

There is need to promote sound environmental management in order to enhance adoption of green energy. Conservation of the environment ensures that certain renewable sources of energy such as water used for the generation of hydroelectricity is not exhausted due to the depletion of forests and other water catchment areas. It is also imperative to combat climate change through appropriate mitigation and adaptation measures in order to ensure continued availability of green energy sources such as biomass and hydropower. Through these among other measures, adoption of green energy for a bright tomorrow will be realized. In order to actualize Africa’s green dream, it is necessary to upscale investments in green energy sources as renewable energy. The continent has vast potential for renewable sources for energy which remains untapped.

Challenges such as unattractive investment conditions, insufficiently developed legal frameworks for renewable energy development and uneven and inconsistent implementation of regulations have hindered attainment of the green dream in the energy sector in Africa. African countries must address these concerns by creating attractive investment environments, developing efficient legal frameworks on renewable energy and implementing effective regulations in order to enhance the uptake of renewable sources of energy. Further, there is need for adoption of market liberalization policies in the energy sector such as supporting public-private investment, improved private sector access to electricity generation and issuing of green bonds in order to promote renewable sources of energy in Africa. This will fast track realization of Africa’s green dream in the energy sector.

Further, there is need to adopt green agricultural practices such as regenerative agriculture. Regenerative agricultural practices can aid in fostering climate resilient and sustainable green economies in Africa by avoiding the key problems of highly industrialized agriculture production that damage soil health, including vast tracts of monocultivated land, chemical runoffs, overexploitation of water resources, and high chemical and hormonal residue levels in food. This will promote the attainment of food security in Africa while also contributing towards climate change mitigation and adaptation in the quest towards Sustainable Development.

African countries should thus adopt regenerative agricultural practices such as effective soil systems including no tilling and low tilling, crop rotation, use of drought and heat resistant crops, agroforestry, water harvesting, irrigation and green pest control measures. This will enhance actualization of the green dream in the agricultural sector in Africa. In addition, it is vital to promote sustainable utilization and management of water resources in Africa. Water plays a fundamental role in the attainment of Sustainable Development. To this extent, it has been observed that there is a clear nexus between properly managed water resources, economic development and social wellbeing which are key pillars of the sustainable development agenda.

The importance of water is recognized under the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development which seeks to ensure the availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all. However, challenges have been witnessed in the water sector in Africa such as degradation and underutilization of these water resources. It has been observed that sustainable management of water resources and access to safe water and sanitation are essential for unlocking economic growth and productivity, and providing significant leverage for existing investments in health and education. There is need to improve the management of water and water resources in Africa through measures such pollution control, effective waste management, use of water smart landscaping and irrigation and sustainable utilization of water through reusing among other measures. This will promote the attainment of sustainable development goal 6 geared towards enhancing access to clean water and sanitation for all while also actualizing Africa’s green dream in the water sector.

Additionally, Africa should adopt green value chains for minerals. It has been observed that Africa is endowed with a variety of minerals that are central to decarbonization such as the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) which produces over 70% of the world’s cobalt, DRC and Zambia which supply 10% of global copper and Mozambique and South Africa which hold significant reserves of graphite, platinum metals, lithium among other countries. It has been observed that the opportunities presented by the global green mineral boom and domestic achievements such as the African Continental Free-Trade Area can help facilitate development of regional value chains for green economy products in the mining sector. There is need to tap into these opportunities in order foster green value chains towards actualizing Africa’s green dream.

Finally, Africa must fast track the attainment of the Sustainable Development goals and the Sustainable Development agenda. It has been argued that Africa continues to lag behind other regions of the world in achieving the Sustainable Development agenda. The continent has made slow progress in attaining goals such as ending extreme poverty, promoting access to clean water and sanitation, promoting quality education and achieving gender equality. There is need to enhance the attainment of Sustainable Development Goals in Africa through measures such as increased funding, improved public and private partnerships, strengthening domestic legislations, embracing technology and support from the international community. This will accelerate attainment of Sustainable Development in Africa whilst actualizing Africa’s green dream.

*This is an extract from the Book: Achieving Climate Justice for Development (Glenwood Publishers, Nairobi, October 2023) by Hon. Dr. Kariuki Muigua, OGW, PhD, Senior Advocate of Kenya, Chartered Arbitrator, Kenya’s ADR Practitioner of the Year 2021 (Nairobi Legal Awards), ADR Lifetime Achievement Award 2021 (CIArb Kenya), African Arbitrator of the Year 2022, Africa ADR Practitioner of the Year 2022, Member of National Environment Tribunal (NET) Emeritus (2017 to 2022) and Member of Permanent Court of Arbitration nominated by Republic of Kenya. Dr. Kariuki Muigua is a foremost Environmental Law and Natural Resources Lawyer and Scholar, Sustainable Development Advocate and Conflict Management Expert in Kenya. Dr. Kariuki Muigua is a Senior Lecturer of Environmental Law and Dispute resolution at the University of Nairobi School of Law and The Center for Advanced Studies in Environmental Law and Policy (CASELAP). He has published numerous books and articles on Environmental Law, Environmental Justice Conflict Management, Alternative Dispute Resolution and Sustainable Development. Dr. Muigua is also a Chartered Arbitrator, an Accredited Mediator, the Managing Partner of Kariuki Muigua & Co. Advocates and Africa Trustee Emeritus of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators 2019-2022. Dr. Muigua is a 2023 recipient of President of the Republic of Kenya Order of Grand Warrior (OGW) Award for his service to the Nation as a Distinguished Expert, Academic and Scholar in Dispute Resolution and recognized among the top 5 leading lawyers and dispute resolution experts in Band 1 in Kenya by the Chambers Global Guide 2022 and was listed in the Inaugural THE LAWYER AFRICA Litigation Hall of Fame 2023 as one of the Top 50 Most Distinguished Litigation Lawyers in Kenya and the Top Arbitrator in Kenya in 2023.

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News & Analysis

The Nexus between Environmental Social and Governance (ESG) and Arbitration

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By Hon. Prof. Kariuki Muigua, OGW, PhD, C.Arb, FCIArb is a Professor of Environmental Law and Dispute Resolution at the University of Nairobi, Member of Permanent Court of Arbitration, Leading Environmental Law Scholar, Respected Sustainable Development Policy Advisor, Top Natural Resources Lawyer, Highly-Regarded Dispute Resolution Expert and Awardee of the Order of Grand Warrior (OGW) of Kenya by H.E. the President of Republic of Kenya. He is the Academic Champion of ADR 2024, the African ADR Practitioner of the Year 2022, the African Arbitrator of the Year 2022, ADR Practitioner of the Year in Kenya 2021, CIArb (Kenya) Lifetime Achievement Award 2021 and ADR Publisher of the Year 2021 and Author of the Kenya’s First ESG Book: Embracing Environmental Social and Governance (ESG) tenets for Sustainable Development” (Glenwood, Nairobi, July 2023) and Kenya’s First Two Climate Change Law Book: Combating Climate Change for Sustainability (Glenwood, Nairobi, October 2023), Achieving Climate Justice for Development (Glenwood, Nairobi, October 2023) and Promoting Rule of Law for Sustainable Development (Glenwood, Nairobi, January 2024)*

Arbitration is form of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) mechanisms. ADR refers to a set of mechanisms that are applied in management of disputes without resort to adversarial litigation. It has been described as a private and consensual process where parties to a dispute agree to present their grievances to a third party for resolution. It is argued that ESG principles have become a model for sustainable business development through which a corporations’ goal for solving environmental, social and governance problems is achieved. Consequently, ESG considerations have an increasing impact in international business as evidenced by the incorporation of sustainability clauses in investment contracts. In such contracts, investors are required to adhere to the concept of sustainable development as envisaged under the contracts and failure to do so may result in ESG related disputes.

In the wake of the climate change debate, there have been calls for responsible business practice towards climate change mitigation through measures such as reduction of carbon emissions. The Paris Agreement on Climate Change has raised the awareness of the need for global efforts to combat climate change and the role of responsible and ethical corporate behavior towards achieving this goal. Further, corporations are increasingly required to safeguard human rights as envisaged by ‘S’ pillar of ESG.

However, some corporations have been accused of violating these ESG concerns as a result of their business practices. Some corporations have been accused of failing to promote climate change mitigation through reduction of carbon emissions and transitioning to cleaner energy production. Further, some corporations have been accused of violating fundamental human rights such as the right to a clean and healthy environment especially in the investment sphere in Africa. These instances have resulted in an increasing number of ESG-related disputes. The growth of ESG concerns has seen corporations being increasingly required to embrace ESG principles in their business practices. Consequently, ESG clauses are being adopted in commercial and investment contracts.

In case of violation of such clauses, ESG related disputes are bound to occur. It has been asserted that adoption of ESG related practices into pre-existing social and governance models adopted by corporations would be disruptive. The inclusion of ESG clauses in commercial contracts not only points to the importance of ESG concerns to companies but it also serves as potential source of disputes where such considerations are not complied with. ESG issues are not only reshaping corporate behavior across the globe but can also be a potential battleground in international disputes25. This creates the need for an effective mechanism of management of such disputes in order to enhance ESG principles in the quest for Sustainable Development.

Arbitration has for a long time been the most viable mechanism for management of international commercial and investment disputes. It offers a neutral forum for the management of disputes and addresses some of the concerns that parties may have in relation to the other parties’ legal system. In international commercial and investment arbitration, parties are reluctant to submit to the jurisdiction of the other party due to the likelihood of favoritism by the host judicial system. Further, arbitration has the potential of facilitating expeditious management of disputes.

In international commercial and investment arbitration, there is need to manage disputes expeditiously in order to preserve the commercial interests of parties. The viability of arbitration in management of international commercial disputes is further enhanced by the availability of a legal framework for the recognition and enforcement of foreign arbitral awards. The New York Convention provides the legal framework for the recognition and enforcement of foreign arbitral awards across different jurisdictions. Consequently, the adoption of ESG elements in international commercial and investment agreements has resulted in the use of arbitration to manage disputes arising from such agreements.

ESG concerns have become prominent in investor-state arbitration with arbitral tribunals having to determine issues relating to climate change, corruption and human rights. It has been asserted that the growth of ESG will redefine the practice of arbitration as it seeks to adapt to the new concerns created by ESG. However, the flexibility of arbitration and its ability to adapt to emerging concerns means that it is well positioned to manage ESG disputes. However, there is need for reform in order to enhance the role of arbitration in managing ESG disputes.

*This article is an abridged version of the Article The Place of Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) in Arbitration (Available for download at Kariuki Muigua & Co. Advocates Website, follow the link) by Hon. Prof.  Kariuki Muigua, OGW, PhD, Professor of Environmental Law and Dispute Resolution, Senior Advocate of Kenya, Chartered Arbitrator, Kenya’s ADR Practitioner of the Year 2021 (Nairobi Legal Awards), ADR Lifetime Achievement Award 2021 (CIArb Kenya), African Arbitrator of the Year 2022, Africa ADR Practitioner of the Year 2022, Member of National Environment Tribunal (NET) Emeritus (2017 to 2023) and Member of Permanent Court of Arbitration nominated by Republic of Kenya and Academic Champion of ADR 2024. Prof. Kariuki Muigua is a foremost Environmental Law and Natural Resources Lawyer and Scholar, Sustainable Development Advocate and Conflict Management Expert in Kenya. Prof. Kariuki Muigua teaches Environmental Law and Dispute resolution at the University of Nairobi School of Law, The Center for Advanced Studies in Environmental Law and Policy (CASELAP) and Wangari Maathai Institute for Peace and Environmental Studies. He has published numerous books and articles on Environmental Law, Environmental Justice Conflict Management, Alternative Dispute Resolution and Sustainable Development. Prof. Muigua is also a Chartered Arbitrator, an Accredited Mediator, the Managing Partner of Kariuki Muigua & Co. Advocates and Africa Trustee Emeritus of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators 2019-2022. Prof. Muigua is a 2023 recipient of President of the Republic of Kenya Order of Grand Warrior (OGW) Award for his service to the Nation as a Distinguished Expert, Academic and Scholar in Dispute Resolution and recognized among the top 5 leading lawyers and dispute resolution experts in Band 1 in Kenya by the Chambers Global Guide 2024 and was listed in the Inaugural THE LAWYER AFRICA Litigation Hall of Fame 2023 as one of the Top 50 Most Distinguished Litigation Lawyers in Kenya and the Top Arbitrator in Kenya in 2023.

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Mazhorina. M.V., ‘ESG Principles in International Business and Sustainable Contracts’ available at https://aprp.msal.ru/jour/article/view/3223?locale=en_US (accessed on 28/09/2022).

Moses. L.M, ‘The Principles and Practice of International Commercial Arbitration’ 2 nd Edition, 2017, Cambridge University Press 28 Ibid 29Muigua. K., ‘Promoting International Commercial Arbitration in Africa’ available at http://kmco.co.ke/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/PROMOTING-INTERNATIONAL-COMMERCIALARBITRATION-IN-AFRICA.pdf

Muigua. K., ‘International Investment Law and Policy in Africa: Human Rights, Environmental Damage and Sustainable Development’ available at http://kmco.co.ke/wpcontent/uploads/2018/11/International-Investment-Law-and-Policy-in-Africa-AILA-Conference-Paper5-11-2018.pdf (accessed on 28/09/2022)

Muigua. K., ‘Realising Environmental, Social and Governance Tenets for Sustainable Development’ available at http://kmco.co.ke/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Realising-Environmental-Social-andGovernance-Tenets-of-Sustainable-Development-Kariuki-Muigua-July-2022.pdf (accessed on 28/09/2022)

Muigua. K., ‘Settling Disputes Through Arbitration in Kenya’ Glenwood Publishers Limited, 4th Edition, 2022

Ross. A., ‘We need talk about ESG’ available at https://globalarbitrationreview.com/we-need-talkabout-esg (accessed on 28/09/2022)

The ALP Review., ‘The Importance of ESG and its effect on International Arbitration’ available at https://www.alp.company/sites/default/files/ALP%20Review%20- %20The%20Importance%20of%20ESG %20and%20its%20effect%20on%20International%20Arbitration.pdf (accessed on 28/09/2022).

United Nations Conference on International Commercial Arbitration, ‘Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards’ United Nations, 1958

Von Wobeser., ‘The Role of Arbitration in ESG Disputes’ available at https://www.vonwobeser.com/index.php/publication?p_id=1650 (accessed on 28/09/2022)

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News & Analysis

Enhancing the Role of Arbitration in Management of ESG Disputes

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By Hon. Prof. Kariuki Muigua, OGW, PhD, C.Arb, FCIArb is a Professor of Environmental Law and Dispute Resolution at the University of Nairobi, Member of Permanent Court of Arbitration, Leading Environmental Law Scholar, Respected Sustainable Development Policy Advisor, Top Natural Resources Lawyer, Highly-Regarded Dispute Resolution Expert and Awardee of the Order of Grand Warrior (OGW) of Kenya by H.E. the President of Republic of Kenya. He is the Academic Champion of ADR 2024, the African ADR Practitioner of the Year 2022, the African Arbitrator of the Year 2022, ADR Practitioner of the Year in Kenya 2021, CIArb (Kenya) Lifetime Achievement Award 2021 and ADR Publisher of the Year 2021 and Author of the Kenya’s First ESG Book: Embracing Environmental Social and Governance (ESG) tenets for Sustainable Development” (Glenwood, Nairobi, July 2023) and Kenya’s First Two Climate Change Law Book: Combating Climate Change for Sustainability (Glenwood, Nairobi, October 2023), Achieving Climate Justice for Development (Glenwood, Nairobi, October 2023) and Promoting Rule of Law for Sustainable Development (Glenwood, Nairobi, January 2024)*

Arbitration represents a viable mechanism for management of ESG disputes. The following are proposals for interventions towards embracing arbitration in management of ESG disputes for Sustainable Development towards enhancing the use of arbitration in ESG disputes:

Enhancing Knowledge in ESG Concerns

Statistics show that many ESG related disputes are being managed through arbitration. According to the International Chamber of Commerce, engineering, construction and energy disputes represent the highest number of cases handled representing 38% of all cases registered so far. Such disputes entail ESG components such as renewable energy projects, environmental protection and human rights concerns. This demonstrates that ESG and arbitration are inextricably linked. Arbitration practitioners thus need to equip themselves with knowledge in ESG related matters in order to be better placed to manage ESG related disputes.

Promoting Sustainable Development

Sustainable Development has been defined as development that meets the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. This concept entails a combination of elements including environmental protection, economic development and social issues. The importance of Sustainable Development has seen the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals as the global blueprint of development. Most of the Sustainable Development Goals entail aspects of ESG such as clean water and sanitation, affordable and clean energy, industry, innovation and infrastructure and climate action. Arbitration practitioners should therefore promote the principles of sustainable development when managing ESG related disputes. This could entail requiring investors to comply with the host country environmental laws and ESG standards in mining, energy and construction disputes which have an ESG bearing.

Upholding Human Rights

The ‘S’ pillar in ESG seeks to promote responsible and ethical corporate behavior through aspects such as respect for human rights. However, corporate behavior especially in the investment sphere in Africa has resulted in gross violation of human rights. Some corporations which have invested in oil exploration have been accused of human right abuses, environmental degradation and unsustainable peace due to their business culture. In Kenya, a multinational corporation that has invested in the agricultural sector has been accused of human right abuses such as killings, rape, and other forms of sexual and gender-based violence allegedly committed by its guards, bad labour practices and land injustices against the neighbouring communities. Some of these disputes have ended up in arbitration where tribunals are called upon to adjudicate on human rights issues. Arbitrators should thus seek to uphold human rights in such disputes by rendering awards that are in line with human rights standards. By promoting human rights, arbitrators will be embracing the ‘S’ pillar that is fundamental in the ESG debate.

Promoting Good Governance

The Governance pillar in ESG seeks to achieve good financial and accounting standards as well as legal and regulatory compliance, such as transparency, corporate structures and ethics in corporate conduct. It also seeks to align Governance with the Sustainable Development Goals where governance issues include industry, innovation and infrastructure (Goal 9); peace, justice and strong institutions (Goal 16); and partnerships with public and private institutions (Goal 17). Good governance can be promoted through arbitration by rendering awards that adhere to good governance practices such as transparency, accountability, reporting and disclosure.

Seeking Expert Assistance in Complex ESG Matters

Arbitration has a significant role in promoting ESG tenets in areas such as climate change. Arbitrators play a significant role in shaping and adapting international law to respond to the climate crisis. However, in some instances, arbitration has been slow to act to act in response to the climate crisis. Some climate change concerns such as determining adherence to climate change commitments through low carbon transition requires arbitrators to be fully informed and engaged in such concepts. This may require expert analysis and guidance from persons with requisite knowledge in environmental matters. Arbitrators should therefore seek expert assistance in such issues in order to be fully informed and render awards that promote ESG principles.

Conclusion

The relationship between Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) and arbitration continues to grow. Adoption of ESG by corporations as a means of promoting responsible and ethical business practices and the wide use of arbitration in management of international commercial and investment disputes points to increased use of arbitration in management of ESG related disputes. In managing such disputes, arbitrators should promote ESG considerations whilst balancing the needs and interests of parties involved in issues such as climate change. Arbitration represents a viable mechanism for managing ESG disputes while simultaneously promoting Sustainable Development. There is need to enhance the viability of arbitration in management of ESG related disputes.

*This article is an abridged version of the Article The Place of Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) in Arbitration by Hon. Prof.  Kariuki Muigua, OGW, PhD, Professor of Environmental Law and Dispute Resolution, Senior Advocate of Kenya, Chartered Arbitrator, Kenya’s ADR Practitioner of the Year 2021 (Nairobi Legal Awards), ADR Lifetime Achievement Award 2021 (CIArb Kenya), African Arbitrator of the Year 2022, Africa ADR Practitioner of the Year 2022, Member of National Environment Tribunal (NET) Emeritus (2017 to 2023) and Member of Permanent Court of Arbitration nominated by Republic of Kenya and Academic Champion of ADR 2024. Prof. Kariuki Muigua is a foremost Environmental Law and Natural Resources Lawyer and Scholar, Sustainable Development Advocate and Conflict Management Expert in Kenya. Prof. Kariuki Muigua teaches Environmental Law and Dispute resolution at the University of Nairobi School of Law, The Center for Advanced Studies in Environmental Law and Policy (CASELAP) and Wangari Maathai Institute for Peace and Environmental Studies. He has published numerous books and articles on Environmental Law, Environmental Justice Conflict Management, Alternative Dispute Resolution and Sustainable Development. Prof. Muigua is also a Chartered Arbitrator, an Accredited Mediator, the Managing Partner of Kariuki Muigua & Co. Advocates and Africa Trustee Emeritus of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators 2019-2022. Prof. Muigua is a 2023 recipient of President of the Republic of Kenya Order of Grand Warrior (OGW) Award for his service to the Nation as a Distinguished Expert, Academic and Scholar in Dispute Resolution and recognized among the top 5 leading lawyers and dispute resolution experts in Band 1 in Kenya by the Chambers Global Guide 2024 and was listed in the Inaugural THE LAWYER AFRICA Litigation Hall of Fame 2023 as one of the Top 50 Most Distinguished Litigation Lawyers in Kenya and the Top Arbitrator in Kenya in 2023.

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Way Forward in Managing Risk and Liability of ESG Litigation

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By Hon. Prof. Kariuki Muigua, OGW, PhD, C.Arb, FCIArb is a Professor of Environmental Law and Dispute Resolution at the University of Nairobi, Member of Permanent Court of Arbitration, Leading Environmental Law Scholar, Respected Sustainable Development Policy Advisor, Top Natural Resources Lawyer, Highly-Regarded Dispute Resolution Expert and Awardee of the Order of Grand Warrior (OGW) of Kenya by H.E. the President of Republic of Kenya. He is the Academic Champion of ADR 2024, the African ADR Practitioner of the Year 2022, the African Arbitrator of the Year 2022, ADR Practitioner of the Year in Kenya 2021, CIArb (Kenya) Lifetime Achievement Award 2021 and ADR Publisher of the Year 2021 and Author of the Kenya’s First ESG Book: Embracing Environmental Social and Governance (ESG) tenets for Sustainable Development” (Glenwood, Nairobi, July 2023) and Kenya’s First Two Climate Change Law Book: Combating Climate Change for Sustainability (Glenwood, Nairobi, October 2023), Achieving Climate Justice for Development (Glenwood, Nairobi, October 2023) and Promoting Rule of Law for Sustainable Development (Glenwood, Nairobi, January 2024)*

In order for companies to manage the risk and liability associated with ESG litigation, it is imperative for them to strengthen their ESG reporting and disclosure requirements. It has been observed that recent ESG trends have driven the requirement by businesses to report on ESG aspects such as human rights and environmental standards as evidenced by emerging legal frameworks requiring companies to report on human rights and environmental issues, emerging mandatory human rights due diligence legislation, and increased legal enforcement and litigation risks.

As a result, it is important for companies to treat public disclosures in relation to ESG matters seriously and consider taking independent auditing and verification steps, particularly for annual ESG-related reports and/or other material ESG disclosures. Such an approach can help companies effectively manage and reduce the risk of ESG related litigation.

In addition, it has been argued that there is need for companies to embrace best practices in order to mitigate the risks of ESG litigation and also address such litigation when it arises. For example, it has been suggested that companies should conduct risk assessments in order to determine the likelihood of ESG related suits and deal with such concerns immediately; undertake public engagement to order to ensure openness and transparency in ESG matters; build knowledge on ESG issues in order to be well equipped to handle ESG claims when they arise; and strengthen their management systems and internal practices in order to enhance compliance with ESG standards.

It has been observed that ESG litigation is associated with several risks to companies including regulatory and enforcement risk, reputational risk, damage to brand, potential disruption by activists and financial risks such as loss of access to capital and financial losses as a result of damages, fines and other forms of monetary compensation. It is also imperative to strengthen access to justice in ESG matters. It has been pointed out that in order for litigants to be given the right of access to courts in ESG matters, whether individually, collectively, or as a third party or amicus curiae, the criteria pertaining to standing, which differ from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, must be followed.

It is also necessary to widen and strengthen the jurisdiction of courts on ESG issues such as climate change. Further, it has been pointed out that there is need to embrace techniques such as litigation funding in order to provide the financial stability and support needed to pursue legal action without compromising on the quality of representation or legal strategy in ESG matters. It has been argued that litigation funding can be an effective strategy for needy claimants to pursue claims against a company that they may ordinarily not be able to afford, enabling them to ultimately to hold companies to account for ESG failures.

Finally, it is imperative for companies to think creatively and strategically in order to effectively resolve ESG claims. It has been pointed out that ESG claims may significantly differ from other types of litigation companies have previously faced, hence the need for creative solutions towards these claims. For example, in ESG claims, there is need to bear in mind both the litigation aspects of a dispute, and broader ESG concerns including those around reputation and access to capital. As a result, it has been suggested that there is need for companies to be alive to the potential for resolving ESG claims outside the court room, and what mitigation strategies could be deployed to avoid litigation.

Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) mechanisms are ideal in managing ESG disputes by fostering privacy, cost effective and expeditious management of disputes while also allowing parties to select experts to hear and determine contentious ESG matters. In addition, it has correctly been observed that businesses would normally prefer to have their disputes managed in a private manner in order to prevent ruining their image in public and also in an expeditious and cost-effective manner in order to protect business interests.

It has also been pointed out that the use of ADR mechanisms such as mediation in managing ESG related disputes is a practical demonstration of a sustainability-oriented business culture since mediation can offer a quick, flexible, consensual and win-win solution based on the mutually accepted interests of the parties. ADR mechanisms can therefore be an effective tool to enable companies manage the risks associated with ESG litigation.

*This is an extract from the Article: Fostering Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) Litigation for Sustainability, Available at: https://kmco.co.ke/wp-content/uploads/2024/02/Fostering-Environmental-Social-and-Governance-ESG-Litigation-for-Sustainability.pdf (Accessed 2nd March 2024) by Hon. Prof.  Kariuki Muigua, OGW, PhD, Professor of Environmental Law and Dispute Resolution, Senior Advocate of Kenya, Chartered Arbitrator, Kenya’s ADR Practitioner of the Year 2021 (Nairobi Legal Awards), ADR Lifetime Achievement Award 2021 (CIArb Kenya), African Arbitrator of the Year 2022, Africa ADR Practitioner of the Year 2022, Member of National Environment Tribunal (NET) Emeritus (2017 to 2023) and Member of Permanent Court of Arbitration nominated by Republic of Kenya and Academic Champion of ADR 2024. Prof. Kariuki Muigua is a foremost Environmental Law and Natural Resources Lawyer and Scholar, Sustainable Development Advocate and Conflict Management Expert in Kenya. Prof. Kariuki Muigua teaches Environmental Law and Dispute resolution at the University of Nairobi School of Law, The Center for Advanced Studies in Environmental Law and Policy (CASELAP) and Wangari Maathai Institute for Peace and Environmental Studies. He has published numerous books and articles on Environmental Law, Environmental Justice Conflict Management, Alternative Dispute Resolution and Sustainable Development. Prof. Muigua is also a Chartered Arbitrator, an Accredited Mediator, the Managing Partner of Kariuki Muigua & Co. Advocates and Africa Trustee Emeritus of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators 2019-2022. Prof. Muigua is a 2023 recipient of President of the Republic of Kenya Order of Grand Warrior (OGW) Award for his service to the Nation as a Distinguished Expert, Academic and Scholar in Dispute Resolution and recognized among the top 5 leading lawyers and dispute resolution experts in Band 1 in Kenya by the Chambers Global Guide 2024 and was listed in the Inaugural THE LAWYER AFRICA Litigation Hall of Fame 2023 as one of the Top 50 Most Distinguished Litigation Lawyers in Kenya and the Top Arbitrator in Kenya in 2023.

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